Tips for Taxpayers Who Receive an IRS Notice

IRS DebtEvery year the IRS sends millions of letters and notices to taxpayers. In the event one shows up in your mailbox, here are some things every taxpayer should be aware of just in case you receive one.

  1. Remain calm, but don’t ignore the notice either. Many of these letters can be dealt with very simply, but they  must be dealt with in a timely fashion. Contact us and send us a copy of your notice by fax or through our secure client portal. If sending to us by e-mail, make sure you block out any sensitive information, like social security numbers.
  2. Receiving an IRS notice doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve done anything wrong or that you are going to be audited. There are many reasons the IRS sends notices to taxpayers. The notice may request payment of taxes, notify you of a change to your account or request additional information. The notice you receive normally covers a very specific issue about your account or tax return.
  3. Each letter and notice offers specific instructions on what you need to do to satisfy the inquiry.NOTE: IRS notices are only sent by USPS mail! At this time, the IRS NEVER sends  any correspondence by email, and will only fax when you or your representative request it. If you receive and “IRS Notice” IT IS FAKE! And most likely a “phishing” scam/attempt.
  4. If you receive a notice about a correction to your tax return, you should review the correspondence and compare it with the information on your return.
  5. If you agree with the correction to your account, usually no reply is necessary unless a payment is due.
  6. If you do not agree with the correction the IRS made, it is important that you respond as requested. We will assist you in writing to explain why we disagree with the notice. We will include any documents and information we wish the IRS to consider, along with a copy of the notice.
  7. Most correspondence can be handled without calling or visiting an IRS office. However, we may be able to resolve your IRS matter by contacting them by phone. We will need a copy of your tax return and all the correspondence available.
  8. It is important that you keep copies of any correspondence with your tax records.
  9. IRS notices that result in a change may also result in State tax issues and notices. We can assist you with these as well, so forward them to our office for resolutions.

For more information or assistance with your IRS notices, please feel free to contact our offices.

This article is provided for information purposes only and should not be relied upon for legal or financial advice. We would be happy to discuss how the information in this article affects or may help you. For more details about this matter, please contact our offices at 847-466-7947 of 702-966-2770.
IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: Pursuant to requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, any tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of avoiding penalties imposed under the United States Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing or recommending to another person any tax-related matter.
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Fourth Amendment Right to Privacy Upheld For E-mails!

GavelAsk Bob, Enzyte gave him back the male performance he needed, even though urologists insisted that there was no ingredient in the product guaranteed to promote virility.  But this did not stop customers for calling the 800 number and buying the product, nor stop Berkeley Premium Pharmaceuticals, producer of Enzyte from growing to a company with 1500 employees making annual sales of $250 million with their “Auto-Ship” program.

But whether Enzyte helped or not the “Auto-Ship” program rankled customers and by 2002 the there were 1,500 complaints, according to the ruling by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati.

In 2006, a federal grand jury handed down a 112-count indictment on fraud related charges against Steven Warshak owner of Berkeley as and co-defendents which included his mother and another of his businesses. And in August of 2008 the Court ordered Warshak to pay a fine of $93,000 and to forfeit the sums of $459,540,000 and $44,876,781.68, representing the proceeds of his crimes and sentenced him to 25 years in prison and his mother Harriet to 24 years imprisonment.

Defendants, Warshak and his mother, appealed the decision, claiming that government agents violated Warshak’s Fourth Amendment rights when compelling his Internet Service Provider (ISP) to turn over and produce the content of emails without first obtaining a warrant based on probable cause.

On appeal Warshak’s sentence was reduced to 10 years and his mother’s to one day. In it’s opinion the US Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals held that:

“Given the fundamental similarities between email and traditional forms of communication [like postal mail and telephone calls], it would defy common sense to afford emails lesser Fourth Amendment protection…. It follows that email requires strong protection under the Fourth Amendment; otherwise the Fourth Amendment would prove an ineffective guardian of private communication, an essential purpose it has long been recognized to serve…. [T]he police may not storm the post office and intercept a letter, and they are likewise forbidden from using the phone system to make a clandestine recording of a telephone call–unless they get a warrant, that is. It only stands to reason that, if government agents compel an ISP to surrender the contents of a subscriber’s emails, those agents have thereby conducted a Fourth Amendment search, which necessitates compliance with the warrant requirement…”

Regardless of the outcome, this case is important to us, because it marked the first time that the Court extended the Fourth Amendment protection that an individual has a reasonable expectation of privacy in the contemporary world of email correspondence.

This article is provided for information purposes only and should not be relied upon for legal or financial advice. We would be happy to discuss how the information in this article affects or may help you. For more details about this matter, please contact our offices at 847-466-7947 of 702-966-2770.

IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: Pursuant to requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, any tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of avoiding penalties imposed under the United States Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing or recommending to another person any tax-related matter.

 

Be Preapred for Higher Taxes

AFSB Money BagWithout Congressional Action, Many Tax Provisions Will Expire.

If Congress doesn’t take action before the end of the year, federal tax increases will go into effect next year, raising levies on income, capital gains, dividends, wages, gifts, estates, and more. This is due to numerous tax provisions adopted by the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (hereinafter EGTRRA) and the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003 (hereinafter JGTRRA), which are scheduled to expire at the end of 2012. The following is a summary of some of the more important tax provisions scheduled to expire.

Individual Tax Rates

Under EGTRRA our tax tax rates are 10, 15, 25, 28, 33, and 35 percent. Unless Congress acts, for tax years after 2012, the tax rates will go back to the pre-EGTRRA rates of 15, 28, 31, 36, and 39.6 percent. In other words without action, the 25%, 28%, 33%, and 35% tax rates will increase, and the 10% tax bracket will go away completely.

Tax rates on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends, which are currently 15% (0% for taxpayers in the lowest two income brackets) are also set to change. Without Congressional action, the long-term capital gains rate would revert to 20% for most taxpayers and to 10% for those in the 15% income tax bracket in 2013. Qualified dividends, meanwhile, would go back to being taxed as ordinary income, so for some investors, the top tax rate could rise to 39.6%

Marriage Penalty Relief

The marriage penalty will be back.  EGTRRA increased the basic standard deduction for a married couple filing a joint return to twice the basic standard deduction for an unmarried individual filing a single return. The basic standard deduction for a married taxpayer filing separately continued to equal one-half of the basic standard deduction for a married couple filing jointly; thus, the basic standard deduction for unmarried individuals filing a single return and for married couples filing separately are the same.

After 2012, the law will revert to married couples filing jointly receiving a standard deduction which is 167 percent of the deduction for single individuals rather than 200 percent. Individuals filing as married filing separately will receive half of that amount.

EGTRRA also increased the size of the 15-percent regular income tax rate bracket for a married couple filing a joint return to twice the size of the corresponding rate bracket for an unmarried individual filing a single return. After 2012, the upper limit of the 15 percent bracket for married individuals filing jointly is scheduled to be 167 percent of the upper limit for single individuals, rather than 200 percent.

Child Tax Credit

After 2012, the child tax credit is scheduled to revert to $500 from its current $1,000. In addition, the more favorable rules relating to the amount of the credit that is refundable are scheduled to expire in 2012

Overall Limitation on Itemized Deductions

The limitation on certain itemized deductions (known as Pease, named for the congressman who helped create the legislation) and the phaseout of personal exemptions (known as PEP, personal exemption phaseout) also need to be addressed. These provisions have the effect of further increasing the tax rate of people in higher income tax brackets. PEP and Pease are currently suspended, but they will come back in 2013 unless Congress acts.

Other Tax Benefits Expiring

Other taxes that would be impacted include: tax benefits for education, adoption, and dependent care.

And some provisions have expired already!

Several popular tax provisions expired at the end of 2011. These provisions have routinely been extended in the past, but because of the tight budget situation, lawmakers will be scrutinizing them more closely, and some of the provisions may not be renewed. Here are a few of the items on the bubble:

The option to deduct state and local sales taxes on your federal return instead of state and local income taxes.

The ability to make tax-free individual retirement account (IRA) distributions to qualified charities at age 70½.

Various energy efficiency tax credits.

The ability to deduct mortgage insurance premiums on your federal tax return.

The alternative minimum tax (AMT) patch is another item that has yet to be renewed for 2012. Without it, the exemption amount will drop to the 2000 level of $45,000 from last year’s $74,450 for couples filing jointly. If that happens, about 31 million taxpayers would have to pay at least some AMT in 2012, compared to 4 million in 2011.

All in All, if our congress does nothing, they will have effectively  increased your taxes, in an already difficult economic time.


This article is provided for information purposes only and should not be relied upon for legal or financial advice. We would be happy to discuss how the information in this article affects or may help you. For more details about this matter, please contact our offices at 847-466-7947 of 702-966-2770.

IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: Pursuant to requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, any tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of avoiding penalties imposed under the United States Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing or recommending to another person any tax-related matter.

IRS Tightens Application Requirements for ITINS

The Internal Revenue Service today announced important interim changes to strengthen its procedures for issuing Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers (ITINs) from now through the end of the year. Designed specifically for tax-administration purposes, ITINs are only issued to people who are not eligible to obtain a Social Security Number.

During this interim period, the IRS will only issue ITINs when applications include original documentation, such as passports and birth certificates, or certified copies of these documents from the issuing agency. During this interim period, ITINs will not be issued based on applications supported by notarized copies of documents. In addition, ITINs will not be issued based on applications submitted through certifying acceptance agents unless they attach original documentation or copies of original documents certified by the issuing agency. The changes, which are effective immediately, are designed to strengthen and protect the integrity of the ITIN process while minimizing the impact on taxpayers.

The procedures apply to most applicants submitting Form W-7, Application for IRS Individual Taxpayer Identification Number. ITINs play a critical role in the tax administration process and assist with the collection of taxes from foreign nationals, non-resident aliens and others who have filing or payment obligations under U.S. law.

During this interim period, people who need ITINS to get their tax return processed can do so by submitting by mail their original documentation or certified copies of their documentation. Documentation will be accepted at IRS walk-in sites but will be forwarded to the ITIN centralized site for processing. The IRS also has an additional set of questions and answers for ITIN applicants available.

The IRS may require some taxpayers who have already filed applications to furnish additional documentation directly to the IRS. No additional action is required for people who have already filed ITIN requests unless they are contacted by the IRS.

This article is provided for information purposes only and should not be relied upon for legal or financial advice. We would be happy to discuss how the information in this article affects or may help you. For more details about this matter, please contact our offices at 847-466-7947 of 702-966-2770.

IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: Pursuant to requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, any tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of avoiding penalties imposed under the United States Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing or recommending to another person any tax-related matter.

Need More Time to File or Pay Your 2011 Individual Income Tax Return?

1040 & CoinsThe IRS says don’t panic. Tax-filing extensions are available to taxpayers who need more time to finish their returns. Remember, this is an extension of time to file; not an extension of time to pay. However, taxpayers who are having trouble paying what they owe usually qualify for payment plans and other relief. Last month, for example, the IRS, as part of its Fresh Start initiative announced penalty relief for unemployed taxpayers and self-employed individuals whose income has dropped.

Either way, taxpayers will avoid stiff penalties if they file either a regular income tax return or a request for a tax-filing extension by this year’s April 17 deadline. Taxpayers should file, even if they can’t pay the full amount due. Here are further details on the options available.

More Time to File:

People who haven’t finished filling out their return can get a six-month extension by filing a request for an automatic tax-filing extension on Form 4868. Filing this form gives taxpayers until Oct. 15 to file a return. This form can be e-filed or mailed in, and should be sent certified mail if you are using the mail in option, so that you have proof of delivery. To get the extension, taxpayers must estimate their tax liability on this form and should also pay any amount due.

By properly filing this form, a taxpayer will avoid the late-filing penalty, normally five percent per month based on the unpaid balance, that applies to returns filed after the deadline. In addition, any payment made with an extension request will reduce or eliminate interest and late-payment penalties that apply to payments made after April 17. The current interest rate is three percent per year, compounded daily, and the late-payment penalty is normally 0.5 percent per month.

Some taxpayers get more time to file without having to ask for it. These include:

  • Taxpayers abroad. U.S. citizens and resident aliens who live and work abroad, as well as members of the military on duty outside the U.S., have until June 15 to file and pay. However, interest is still due on any tax payment made after April 17.
  • Members of the military and others serving in Iraq, Afghanistan or other combat zone localities. Typically, taxpayers can wait until at least 180 days after they leave the combat zone to file returns and pay any taxes due. For details, see Extensions of Deadlines in Publication 3, Armed Forces Tax Guide.
  • People affected by certain tornadoes, severe storms, floods and other recent natural disasters. Currently, parts of Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia are covered by federal disaster declarations, and affected individuals and businesses in these areas have until May 31 to file and pay.

Ways to Pay

Taxpayers with a balance due IRS now have several quick and easy ways to electronically pay what they owe. They include:

  • Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS). This free service gives taxpayers a safe and convenient way to pay individual and business taxes by phone or online. To enroll or for more information, call 800-316-6541 or visit www.eftps.gov.
  • Electronic funds withdrawal. E-file and e-pay in a single step.
  • Credit or debit card. Both paper and electronic filers can pay their taxes by phone or online through any of several authorized credit and debit card processors. Though the IRS does not charge a fee for this service, the card processors do. For taxpayers who itemize their deductions, these convenience fees can be claimed on Schedule A Line 23.
  • By Check or Money Order, sent with the mailed 4868 form. Taxpayers who choose to pay by check or money order should make the payment out to the “United States Treasury.” Write “2011 Form 1040,” name, address, daytime phone number and Social Security number on the front of the check or money order. To help insure that the payment is credited promptly, also enclose a Form 1040-V payment voucher.
  • By electronic debit request, sent directly with e-filed extensions. The balance due with the extension will be taken directly out of your bank account.

Just Need More Time to Pay?

Taxpayers who have finished their returns should file by the regular April 17 deadline, even if they can’t pay the full amount due. In many cases, those struggling with unpaid taxes qualify for one of several relief programs, including those recently expanded under the IRS “Fresh Start” initiative. Further, filing on time when you can’t pay reduces or eliminates tax penalties that extensions do not.

Need Help with Payment Arrangements?

If you owe IRS, there are several ways you can setup payment arrangements and in some cases can have as much as six years to pay. Call our offices and we can discuss options that fit your particular situation.

If you are unemployed or a self-employed individual whose business income dropped substantially you may be eligible to apply for a six-month extension of time to pay. Eligible taxpayers will not be charged a late-payment penalty if they pay any tax, penalty and interest due by Oct. 15, 2012. Taxpayers qualify if they were unemployed for any 30-day period between Jan. 1, 2011 and April 17, 2012. Self-employed people qualify if their business income declined 25 percent or more in 2011, due to the economy. Income limits and other special rules apply.

And finally, some struggling taxpayers may qualify for an offer-in-compromise. This is an agreement between a taxpayer and the IRS that settles the taxpayer’s tax liabilities for less than the full amount owed. Generally, an offer will not be accepted if the IRS believes the liability can be paid in full as a lump sum or through a payment agreement. The IRS looks at the taxpayer’s income and assets to make a determination regarding the taxpayer’s ability to pay.

Contact our office for more information.

This article is provided for information purposes only and should not be relied upon for legal or financial advice. We would be happy to discuss how the information in this article affects or may help you. For more details about this matter, please contact our offices at 847-466-7947 of 702-966-2770.

IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: Pursuant to requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, any tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of avoiding penalties imposed under the United States Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing or recommending to another person any tax-related matter.

Taxpayers Get More Time to Contribute to IRAs in 2012

Get a tax break NEst Eggand build up your retirement nest egg, and this year you have two extra days to make this year contributions to your Individual Retirement Arrangements. That’s because April 15 falls on a weekend and Emancipation Day, a legal holiday in the District of Columbia, will be observed on Monday, April 16. That means the due date for filing your tax return and making contributions to your 2011 IRA is Tuesday, April 17.

Here are the top 10 things the IRS wants you to know about setting aside retirement money in a traditional IRA.

  1. You may be able to deduct some or all of your contributions to your IRA. You may also be eligible for the Savers Credit, formally known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit.
  2. Contributions can be made to your traditional IRA at any time during the year or by the due date for filing your return for that year, not including extensions. For most people, this means you must make contributions for 2011 by April 17, 2012. If you contribute between Jan. 1 and April 17, you should designate the year targeted for the contribution.
  3. The funds in your IRA are generally not taxed until you receive distributions from it.
  4. Use the worksheets in the instructions for either Form 1040A or Form 1040 to figure your deduction for your IRA contributions.
  5. For 2011, the most you can contribute to your traditional IRA is generally the smaller of the following amounts: $5,000 for most taxpayers, $6,000 for taxpayers who were 50 or older at the end of 2011 or the amount of your taxable compensation for the year.
  6. Use Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to determine whether you are also eligible for a tax credit equal to a percentage of your contribution.
  7. You must use either Form 1040A or Form 1040 to deduct your IRA contribution or claim the Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions.
  8. You must be under age 70 1/2 at the end of the tax year in order to contribute to a traditional IRA.
  9. To contribute to an IRA, you must have taxable compensation, such as wages, salaries, commissions, tips, bonuses, or net income from self-employment. If you file a joint return, generally only one spouse needs to have taxable compensation. However, see Spousal IRA Limits in IRS Publication 590, Individual Retirement Arrangements, for additional rules.
  10. Refer to IRS Publication 590 for more information on contributing to your IRA account.

 This article is provided for information purposes only and should not be relied upon for legal or financial advice. We would be happy to discuss how the information in this article affects or may help you. For more details about this matter, please contact our offices at 847-466-7947 of 702-966-2770.

IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: Pursuant to requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, any tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of avoiding penalties imposed under the United States Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing or recommending to another person any tax-related matter.

Illinois Legislation Requires Lenders to Respond to Short Sale Requests within Ninety Days

Written & Contributed by Karen G. Courtney, Managing Attorney, Attorneys’ Title Guaranty Fund, Inc. Short Sale Coordination

House KeyThe short sale process is complicated and lengthy. Distressed homeowners often experience frustration with the short sale approval process because many lenders do not respond to the homeowner’s request for a short sale in a timely manner. Many short sales fail when buyers walk away due to their unwillingness to wait the many months it often takes to obtain short sale approval. A new law in Illinois could bring relief to distressed homeowners.

Effective January 13, 2012, the Illinois Mortgage Foreclosure Law was amended to add new Section 15-1401.1, which requires the mortgagee in a foreclosure of residential real estate to respond to the mortgagor’s written request for a short sale within 90 days after receipt of a bona fide written offer to purchase the property that is the subject of the foreclosure proceeding and written request from mortgagor to approve the sale on the terms of the offer to purchase. See 735 ILCS 5/15-1401.1(b).

Presumably, if a lender fails to respond within this 90-day period, the borrower could bring a motion before the judge hearing the foreclosure case to compel a response from the lender regarding the request for a short sale. Under Section 15-1401.1(c), however, the mortgagee shall determine whether to accept the mortgagor’s short sale offer, and failure to accept the offer shall not impair, abrogate, or affect the status of the foreclosure proceedings, and the 90-day period shall not operate as a stay of the foreclosure proceedings. See 735 ILCS 5/15-1401.1(c). The full text of Section 15-1401.1 provides as follows:

Sec. 15-1401.1. Short sale in foreclosure.(a) For purposes of this Section, “short sale” means the sale of real estate that is subject to a mortgage for an amount that is less than the amount owed to the mortgagee on the outstanding mortgage note.(b) In a foreclosure of residential real estate, if (i) the mortgagor presents to the mortgagee a bona fide written offer from a third party to purchase the property that is the subject of the foreclosure proceeding, (ii) the written offer to purchase is for an amount which constitutes a short sale of the property, and (iii) the mortgagor makes a written request to the mortgagee to approve the sale on the terms of the offer to purchase, the mortgagee must respond to the mortgagor within 90 days after receipt of the written offer and written request.(c) The mortgagee shall determine whether to accept the mortgagor’s short sale offer. Failure to accept the offer shall not impair or abrogate in any way the rights of the mortgagee or affect the status of the foreclosure proceedings. The 90-day period shall not operate as a stay of the proceedings.

This amendment does not provide for any monetary penalties for non-compliance, but the hope is that it will incentivize reputable lenders to respond to homeowners’ short sale requests in a timely fashion. The process is complicated enough without unnecessary delays.

One possible unintended consequence of this amendment, however, could be that some lenders may simply decline a short sale request without fully evaluating it when faced with a 90-day response time frame and motion to compel. Nevertheless, this amendment gives homeowners a potential judicial remedy to help keep the short sale process moving forward in a timely manner.

Attorneys’ Title Guaranty Fund, Inc., Can Help Us Coordinate Your Short Sales

Short sales are difficult to complete. The process is inefficient and labor intensive. Attorneys’ Title Guaranty Fund, Inc. can help us take care of the administrative tasks involved in obtaining short sale approvals, so we can focus on doing what we do best—representing you, our client. ATG’s experienced Short Sale Coordination professionals perform the following tasks:

  •  Work directly with our office, your real estate agent and you to assemble and submit documentation in an efficient and timely manner to persuade the lender to agree to the short sale.
  • Partner with the us to prepare and submit the required HUD-1 Settlement Statement.
  • Communicate with lenders and servicers throughout the short sale process, saving everyone valuable time.

If the short sale is not approved, ATG charges no fee! Interested? Have questions? Contact us.

Our Title Company, ATG Can Help us Close Your Short Sales

Short sales are difficult to complete. The process is inefficient and labor intensive. ATG helps us take care of the administrative tasks involved in obtaining short sale approvals, so we can focus on doing what you do best—representing you our client. ATG’s experienced Short Sale Coordination professionals perform the following tasks:

  • Work directly with us, your attorneys and you to assemble and submit documentation in an efficient and timely manner to persuade the lender to agree to the short sale.
  • Partner with the us to prepare and submit the required HUD-1 Settlement Statement.
  • Communicate with lenders and servicers throughout the short sale process, saving the everyone valuable time.

If the short sale is not approved, ATG charges no fee! Contact our office for more information.

This article is provided for information purposes only and should not be relied upon for legal or financial advice. We would be happy to discuss how the information in this article affects or may help you. For more details about this matter, please contact our offices at 847-466-7947 of 702-966-2770.

IRS CIRCULAR 230 DISCLOSURE: Pursuant to requirements imposed by the Internal Revenue Service, any tax advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is not intended to be used, and cannot be used, for purposes of avoiding penalties imposed under the United States Internal Revenue Code or promoting, marketing or recommending to another person any tax-related matter.

ATG EDITOR’S NOTE: In the event that this communication is disseminated to the consumer in connection with ATG’s Short Sale Coordination Services, ATG hereby provides the consumer with the following disclosures in compliance with the Mortgage Assistance Relief Services Rule (16 C.F.R. Part 322) promulgated by the Federal Trade Commission:

 IMPORTANT NOTICE FROM ATG – You may stop doing business with us at any time. You may accept or reject the offer of mortgage assistance we obtain from your lender [or servicer]. If you reject the offer, you do not have to pay us. If you accept the offer, you will have to pay us an amount equal to one percent (1%) of the purchase price, or a minimum of $2,000.00, whichever is greater, for our services. ATG is not associated with the government, and our service is not approved by the government or your lender. Even if you accept this offer and use our service, your lender may not agree to change your loan. If you stop paying your mortgage, you could lose your home and damage your credit rating.

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED IN THE TRUSTED ADVISER  – which is published by Attorneys’ Title Guaranty Fund, Inc., P.O. Box 9136, Champaign, IL 61826-9136. Inquiries may be made directly to Mary Beth McCarthy, Corporate Communications Manager. ATG®, ATG® plus logo, are marks of Attorneys’ Title Guaranty Fund, Inc. and are registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The contents of the The Trusted Adviser © Attorneys’ Title Guaranty Fund, Inc..